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Viewing website implies consent to set cookies on your computer. Full details Swaledale and Arkengarthdale Archaeology Group
Registered Charitable Incorporated Organisation Number 1155775
SWAAG Honorary President:
Tim Laurie FSA

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 *****SWAAG_ID***** 826
 Date Entered 04/08/2014
 Updated on 07/08/2014
 Recorded by Tim Laurie
 Category Tree Site Record
 Record Type Botanical HER
 Site Access Public Footpath
 Location River Tees, South Bank, upstream from Winston Bridge to Fewster Gill.
 Civil Parish Not known
 Brit. National Grid NZ 142 161
 Altitude 100m
 Geology River gorge cut through thin limestones, mudstones and sandstones of Namurian Age. The presence of tufa forming seepages above shales within outcropping sandstones mark the outcrop of Marine Bands.
 Record Name Mixed deciduous woodland with both Small-leaved and Large-leaved Lime trees on riverside cliffs below the Winston Holiday Park
 Record Description This is the second of a series of records which will place on record the existence of a substantial population of native lime trees of both species, small and large-leaved limes (Tilia cordata and T. platyphyllos) and natural hybrids of these species. These trees grow on and below inaccessible cliffs, at intervals on both banks of the River Tees downstream of Cotherstone to Winston Bridge, a distance of some eight miles. The Large leaved lime (Tilia platyphyllos) trees are at the northern and western limit of this species in Britain. The Tilia trees grow as small clusters of usually less than 12 trees located at the top edge of the riverside cliffs and on the talus slopes below the cliffs. These records of the Tilia trees on the Tees commenced with a record of Stony Bank Wood on the north bank of the Tees at Stony Bank Wood and will now continue with a brief photographic account of the lime trees on the south bank of the Tees upstream of Winston Bridge and across the river from Stony Bank. Future records will describe the remaining fine woodlands which include native looking Tilia trees, on both North and South Banks of the Tees further upstream. In contrast to the Tilia trees of Lower Swaledale, which are predominantly Large-leaved Limes (T.platyphyllos) or hybrids, the majority of the Lime (Tilia) trees recorded to date on both banks of the River Tees are Small Leaved Limes (Tilia cordata). However a small cluster of five Large Leaved Lime (Tilia platyphyllos) trees have been recognised on the South Bank of the Tees, at the confluence of Fewster Gill Beck with the Tees. Just one Tilia platyphyllos tree has been recognised to date on the North Bank of the Tees, further upstream at Low Barn. However this reconnaissance is work in progress and further trees of both species are expected to be located.
 Dimensions See photographs
 Additional Notes A total of 12 Lime trees of native character have been located at this locality which are provisionally identified as follows:- Small-leaved Limes, 7No. Large-leaved Limes 4No. and one hybrid Lime. For details of individual specimen trees of Tilia and other species located in Riverside Woodland on the Banks of the Tees, see the Woodland Trust Ancient Tree Hunt following links from the Interactive Map.
 Image 1 ID 5711         Click image to enlarge
 Image 1 Description River Tees south bank. View downstream towards Winston Bridge with large Tilia tree in mid frame.
 Image 2 ID 5712         Click image to enlarge
 Image 2 Description This large, coppiced Tilia tree grows on a low outcrop just above the River and beside the public footpath.
 Image 3 ID 5713         Click image to enlarge
 Image 3 Description Detail of the same tree.
 Image 4 ID 5714         Click image to enlarge
 Image 4 Description River Tees, south bank with small-leaved lime tree (Tilia cordata) overhanging the river.
 Image 5 ID 5715         Click image to enlarge
 Image 5 Description Detail of this very large cliff edge tree.Note that this tree grows on the top edge of a low cliff encrusted with white tufa.
 Image 6 ID 5716         Click image to enlarge
 Image 6 Description Detail of this very large cliff edge tree and the tufa deposit.
 Image 7 ID 5717         Click image to enlarge
 Image 7 Description View upstream with further Tilia riverside trees in fresh spring foliage.
 Image 8 ID 5718         Click image to enlarge
 Image 8 Description Small-leaved lime tree on the top edge of a cliff of sandstone with interbedded black shale coated with tufa.
 Image 9 ID 5719         Click image to enlarge
 Image 9 Description Green mosses mark the tufa which coats b;ack shale revealed where the tufa has fallen away.
 Image 10 ID 5720         Click image to enlarge
 Image 10 Description Detail of the black shale and tufa.
 Image 11 ID 5721
 Image 11 Description River Tees South Bank. Multi stemmed or self coppiced small leaved limes, with pendunculate oak, ash, holly and wych elm grow on the edge of the tufa coated sandstone cliff.
 Image 12 ID 5722
 Image 12 Description Further detail of small leaved limes.
 Image 13 ID 5723
 Image 13 Description River Tees South Bank. Small leaved limes on the edge of the tufa coated sandstone cliff.
 Image 14 ID 5724
 Image 14 Description The species rich woodland which grows on these inaccessible cliffs includes many ancient native trees and has not been modified by human extraction or planting.
 Image 15 ID 5725
 Image 15 Description Two Large-leaved lime trees (Tilia platyphyllos) grow on the steep slope above the river just below the confluence with Fewster Gill.
 Image 16 ID 5726
 Image 16 Description The small population of native limes on both banks of the Tees includes individual trees of different age. These examples are mature trees but not ancient trees.
 Image 17 ID 5727
 Image 17 Description Two Tilia platyphyllos trees on the river bank with Quercus robur.
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